Q&A

Please use the form at the bottom for your inquiry. Please note the deadline for Question and Answer is March 30. Response will be published on this page on April 6, 2012.

Important: Enter QA 100 in Subject Line.

 


Hi, I’m an architect currently working in China and am really interested in participating in the competitions. However, before my registration, I would love to have some questions clarified first:
1. Can you provide me with more specific info about the 4 people living in the house? for example their relationships or social status? or they are subject to interpretations?
2. Is 111 m2 the total max construction area, or it’s the max floor area?
3. Will more materials be provided or no?
 

1. You are free to choose the relationship between the 4 individuals.

2. 111 m2 is the maximum floor plan for the building.

3. Continue to check the website, as some reference material will be added.

 

I am joining the 100 mile competition and have started working on my design. I had one question though, as my design requires a large body of water. Does the design have to be on land or can it be partially in a body of water? According to the task, there must be a hypothetical, flat corner site, so I just wanted to write and clarify.
 

You are able to harvest rainwater and treat it on site, but the site would be land bound, typical in Vancouver’s inner city suburbs. A waterfront scheme could be shown as an alternate to the one entered.

 

Can I place my house on the property line or do I need to keep some distance from the borders of the property?
 

Entries will not be disqualified for submitting zero lot line entries, but bear in mind the context of a typical neighbourhood in Vancouver’s inner city and those setbacks, as the jury most certainly will judge with this in mind.

 

I paid my entry in the “100 Mile House” as the receipt below (number: #################) and used this number to fill the Identification Form. I’m in doubt because the number reported by pay pal has 16 characters and not 17 as explained on the site.
How do I know if my application is correct? I wonder if my application will be confirmed by email.
 

That is fine, your version of paypal has generated a 16 digit entry number instead of 17. This number may vary slightly from the one we get when we receive your confirmation from Paypal. We will email a confirmation with this ID number, most likely 17 digits.

 

Hi, we are two Spanish students of architecture and we are interested in the 100 mile house competition.
What we must do to enter the contest?
 

The challenge is to build a house with materials obtained from 100 miles of the house’s site in Vancouver, Canada. To register, please go to http://100mh.architecturefoundationbc.ca/ and under the ‘Enter the Competition’ heading follow the registration instructions. The cost is $50 and once we have received your Paypal confirmation we will email you a unique ID number. Submission deadline is April 26th.

 

One of the basic materials I would like to use is manufactured a bit further (130 miles from Vancouver). Is that alright or should I not use it?
 

As you see from the attached material listing: http://100mh.architecturefoundationbc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/100MH.Form_.pdf there is a section for materials outside the 100 miles, as it may be simply not possible to source all materials locally. You may very well be judged against someone else who have obtained materials from 150 miles, so accuracy counts! Entries will not be disqualified if they use materials outside the 100 miles, but obviously we would encourage you to try to use only what is inside the circle.

 

I’m an architect from Caracas / Venezuela, and my questions are related to the plot, because you said on your website: “zoning and building bylaws of the City of Vancouver are important criteria in reality but again are NOT the focus of the competition.” But I wonder if there is some kind of RS District Schedules (One-Family Dwelling) assigned to this plot? Actually I’m looking for the restrictions in height, construction area, distance from the borders of the plot, ventilation court minimal dimensions, roof slopes, etc.
 

If you look at a typical inner city residential street in Vancouver, say on Google Earth (or VanMap is good), you can understand the context – one and two storey single family homes, with an ample setback from the street, and minimum 3′ side yards. While you will not be disqualified for zero lot line submissions, you will most certainly be judged against those that are more mindful of their context.

 
 
How many floor levels are allowed?
 

You are allowed to build up to 1200 square feet, on one or two levels.

 
 
What is the difference between the registration categories? Can a student win first prize?
 

Students will be judged with the professionals for the same prizes, but only students will be eligible for the student merit prize. The technical category could go to either the professional or student entrant. The ‘merit’ clarification is to simply state the jury may award ‘honourable mentions’ which will receive no cash prize. For more information, go to http://100mh.architecturefoundationbc.ca/about-100mh/prizes/

 

1. Is the area of 111m2 the total build area or just the area of the first floor? 2. How many bedrooms should we plan for the family? 3. Must we plan a garage or this is not necessary?
 

1. The area of 111m2 is the entire building, all floors.
2. Bedrooms and other program are to the discretion of the entrant, keeping in mind more walls means more material.
3. No garage is necessary, again to the discretion of the entrant.

 

I am an architect from Greece interested in participating in the competition. How can I find out what materials are available within 100 miles from Vancouver? Can you provide a reference? Also, does the 100 mile radius concern material sourcing or manufacturing?
 

Sourcing the materials for the house is the research each entrant must do, and as everyone has equal access to the same search engines on the internet, this will be one of the main criteria upon which the work will be judged.

Following are two websites that are a good start, but there are countless more, and entrants are encouraged to research as many as they can.
www.bcbuildinginfo.com/
www.ecobusinesslinks.com/sustainable_building.htm

 

I’m an Architect from Cairo and Egypt isn’t listed in Paypal, so how can I pay for the Competition registration?
 

Thanks for writing. We are sorry that you cannot use PayPal and hope to clear up the confusion. There are several alternatives to PayPal, and they would include completing a wire transfer, or emailing the $50 from your bank, if your bank has that service, or preparing a money order to send – although that will take the longest amount of time.

 

1. We don’t understand the plan or the context. What are the limits with another plot? Where are the streets? How important is this and the dimensions of it? What does ‘lane’ mean? 2. Materials and systems: where can we get information about this? 3. Will be evaluated the landscaping created around the house? 4. Will be evaluated the cost?
 

1. The site is hypothetical, simply a starting point, with the street at one end of the lot and a lane at the other. Adjacent lots would be the same. Dimensions are not important, but to fit in better with the context (i.e. the surrounding houses) you could set the front of the house back from the street, with at least 3′-0″ setbacks from the sides. A typical Vancouver inner city neighbourhood (look at Google Earth at what is typical of Vancouver) has a service road at the rear of the site (this is ‘lane’). 2. We are encouraging entrants to do an exhaustive search for local materials and suppliers, but you can start with these two: www.bcbuildinginfo.com/   http://www.ecobusinesslinks.com/sustainable_building.htm   3. Landscaping will be evaluated only as it relates to the scheme, but this may be to your advantage if it helps the house fit into its context better. 4. Like the previous response, cost will be judged only as it relates to the scheme, for example if you make the argument for an increased cost in order to obtain more materials from within the 100 mile radius.

 

“design a house…with a maximum area of 1200 square feet which is maximum floor plan.”
1. To clarify….this means all useable space within the outside walls or including the outside walls?
“Using only materials and systems made/ manufactured / recycled within 100 miles of the City of Vancouver” 2. Plastic windows can be made within 100 miles but the petroleum comes from afar. Wooden windows can be made within 100 miles but the wood is local will these factors be taken into account? Cement can be made within 100 miles but the embodied energy is high (another factor of sustainability). 3. Clay might have to come from a 200 mile radius but the embodied energy is considerably lower. Does cement win in this situation?

1. The 1200 sq.ft. is to include the thickness of the walls, i.e. to the building’s envelope.

2. You are correct in that some products include multiple components, some of which may or may not come from within 100 miles.

The competition criteria states that the product is to be made / manufactured / recycled within 100 miles.

The higher the content of local materials (within 100 miles) the more judging credit will be afforded.

Common sense must prevail here as you try to retain the ‘spirit’ of the competition, as we of course recognize that it is unreasonable to have every component of every product locally sourced.

3. Again, a correct comment regarding embodied energy, but the spirit of the competition would not include the clay sourced from outside the 100 mile radius.

And the answer to the fourth question sent in a separate email:

4. The 1200 sq.ft. is intended to apply to ‘habitable space’, such that an interstitial space like an unheated attic or crawl space under the house need not be included in this area.

 

I wanted to use the Burrard Inlet as a water source for various purposes. I believe that is within the 100 mile radius, but I wanted to double check and ask if that is possible? 

As we previously responded here: http://100mh.architecturefoundationbc.ca/important-information/qa/

You are therefore able to utilize the water from False Creek or the Burrard Inlet, but you are not on a waterfront site. You are free to enter an alternate scheme sited on the waterfront, otherwise consider the site as a typical inner city lot, i.e. bound on all sides by other similar lots.

 

I have a question regarding the following sentence: Participants are challenged to design a house to accommodate 4 people with a maximum area of 1200 square feet (111M2) using only materials and systems made/ manufactured / recycled within 100 miles of the City of Vancouver. I am particularly interested in knowing where the jury’s, or the competition’s, parameters lie with regards to the use of tools. I ask this question because if you are to build a house with materials harvested and refined within 100 miles, do the tools not also necessarily need to be within 100 miles? If the answer is no, and tools are allowed, is there a limit to the kinds of tools? As a comment, I think that this parameter is critical to this competition because if tools are allowed (which most power tools manufactured today are created with global materials and manufactured around the world) vastly different construction systems, designs and results can be devised. The linearity of building materials are only possible with the advent of steel, and facilitated with the aid of electricity (fossil fuel, hydro or nuclear driven) and spinning blades, all of which are not within 100 miles of Vancouver. The same logic goes for designing with the aid of computers.

Thank you for your question, which raises some important points regarding both the tools and the labour to be used to build the 100 mile house.

Common sense here would be that to the best of one’s ability the entrant should attempt to use only local tools to both design and construct the house, but if it becomes that great a hardship it would make more sense to simply list those tools – whether hammers or laptops – on the list each entrant must provide of the items used for the house that come from outside the 100 mile radius. We most certainly do not want to hinder the process of creating a well thought out product, i.e. the house,

by focusing too much on the minutiae of the process that has produced it, a view that will most likely be shared by the judges.

 

The waste management industry is changing rapidly. Deconstruction of old housing stock is becoming common practice as sustainability permeates deeper into the construction industry. Salvage building materials are available from suppliers within the 100 mile radius. Are we able to spec salvage building materials typically available from deconstruction of old housing stock within the 100 mile radius for our entry?

The answer to your questions is yes to specifying salvaged, recycled, and reused building materials, even going as far as architect Mike Reynolds if you wish: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mike_Reynolds_%28architect%29

Another good link is for Earthship Biotecture from the 1970’s: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earthship

 

What is your plan for publication and exhibition? Please be specific.

While all the details are to be more formalized shortly (and put on the website), the winners are to be announced at a special event at the Vancouver International Film Centre on May 19th, with the only confirmed exhibition at this time as IDSWest in September, though there is sure to be another sooner with time and place TBA. We are also presently in conversation with numerous magazines and publications for post-coverage, including the possibility of an article in Canadian Architect following the announcement of the winners.

 

I am a student of Architecture from India. I am interested in participating in the competition and so are a few of my colleagues. I would like to know the maximum number of members in a team. It would be kind of you to reply to the same at the earliest, so that, we could start working on our design.

To answer your question, there is no restriction on the number of team members for a single entry.

I was a little confused by the site plan available on the competition website. I quickly sketched out an isometric of my current understanding of it – is this correct?

What you’ve shown is one possible interpretation of the site layout, in your case allowing for a maximum southern exposure, which is acceptable.

 

If I submit my project ,will I still have Intellectual Property rights? I have dedicated much time and energy, models – photos, etc. and will require some degree of protection before publication.
A major international architectural firm has called my idea ‘An Urban Solution’ and therefore worthy of compensation, perhaps beyond the prize money.

In response to your question, intellectual property rights remain at all times with the author. For our purposes we only require the rights to publish the material in any exhibitions or publications, as per the website:

“The ownership and copyright of all entry materials submitted remains with their respective creators. By submitting an entry to this competition the entrant agrees to allow the Architecture Foundation of BC the right to display, publish and otherwise exhibit all materials submitted in magazines, books, websites and other media to be determined. Credit will be given to the authors of the material. Participants assume all responsibility for any breach of intellectual property rights or copyright entitlements of others.”

You would be free to seek compensation beyond the competition for the same design if you wish, as stated above the intellectual property (i.e. the idea) belongs to you.

How specific do we need to be with the 100 mile radius for materials? For instance, we may find a piece of mechanical equipment manufactured within 100 miles, but they use some copper tubing in the equipment that comes from over 100 miles away.

As you can see from the attached material listing: http://100mh.architecturefoundationbc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/100MH.Form_.pdf, there is a section for materials obtained from outside the 100 miles, as it simply may not be possible to source all materials locally. Bear in mind however that you may very well be judged against someone else who has obtained more materials from within the 100 miles, so accuracy counts! Entries will not be disqualified if they use materials outside the 100 miles, but obviously we would encourage you to try to use as much as you can from inside the circle.

 

The model that I have built and the resultant pictures have a sign in front with a fictitious name, this is repeated on a write up, again not an actual company name. Both names are for the reason of adding to the explanation of the project only and I could not be contacted through them. Is it alright to leave them as is?

You are free to choose whatever visual means you like to convey your solution, though keep in mind three of the five jurors are architects. You can also refer to the judging and evaluation criteria on the website: http://100mh.architecturefoundationbc.ca/enter-the-competition/judging-evaluation-criteria/

 

What are the presentation requirements? floor plan, elevations, sections, perspectives,..or are you leaving this up to us? Complete artistic freedom.

You are free to choose whatever visual means you like to convey your solution, though keep in mind three of the five jurors are architects. You can also refer to the judging and evaluation criteria on the website: http://100mh.architecturefoundationbc.ca/enter-the-competition/judging-evaluation-criteria/

 

The square footage that is required, is it gross or net?

The square footage given is the maximum, to the outside of the walls (building footprint). Also see the Q&A on the website: http://100mh.architecturefoundationbc.ca/important-information/qa/

 

Are part-time architecture students eligible to submit?

We would encourage both part-time and full-time architecture students to enter the competition.

Are the drawings to be in metric or imperial? Are the plans, sections, etc to be in any specific scale?….for example, 1/4\", etc,

Drawings may be in either metric or imperial. No specific scales set have been specified for the presentation drawings, but given the size of the panels and the size of the house, the typical scales of 1/16″, 1/8″ and 1/4″ (or 1:200, 1:100, and 1:50) would be most appropriate.

 

Basic building materials like Glass, Steel, Aluminum etc. are not mined and smelted or melted in the Region. For example a window unit may be fabricated within 100 mile but the glass that makes up the primary component is not. What is the philosophy to be used in order to determine the acceptability of such products? To be clear sand and is not being melted into glass sheets in Vancouver yet a house without glass is obviously not the competitions intent.

We realize that it may be well nigh impossible to locally source all the materials for a conventional house, so your options are to either try and find as much within the 100 miles and list those materials that fall outside on the sheet submitted with your entry: http://100mh.architecturefoundationbc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/100MH.Form_.pdf

or you may choose unconventional materials, all of which may be found within the 100 miles.

 

1. A balcony or covered terrace will be considered in the calculation of constructed area? Likewise, stilts (pilotis) will be considered in calculating the field of building? 2. If any component of the house is mounted in a radius of 100 miles using materials from other regions or countries, will be accepted? For example, a photovoltaic panel mounted in Vancouver using imported components. 3. What are the distances that the building should remain in relation to neighboring land and streets? 4. Suppose I use in a ground level stilts (pilotis), the house on the second floor and third floor as a covered terrace. This arrangement will result 8.1 meters in height to the house. Is it allowed?

1) A balcony or covered terrace will NOT be included in the floor area calculation.

2) Try to use as many components as possible made/manufactured /recycled within 100 miles. Identify which components you were not able to sourced locally. We recognize it is unlikely that every component in every product will be able to be 100 mile source. Maintain the spirit and intent of the competition to the greatest degree possible.

3) The site is hypothetical, simply a starting point, with the street at one end of the lot and a lane at the other. Adjacent lots would be the same. Dimensions are not important, but to fit in better with the context (i.e. the surrounding houses) you could set the front of the house back from the street, with at least 3′-0″ setbacks from the sides. A typical Vancouver inner city neighbourhood (look at Google Earth at what is typical of Vancouver) has a service road at the rear of the site (this is ‘lane’). Entries will not be disqualified for submitting zero lot line entries, but bear in mind the context of a typical neighbourhood in Vancouver’s inner city and those setbacks, as the jury most certainly will judge with this in mind.

4) There is no height restriction for the competition.

 

1. According to the context and brief “… zoning and building bylaws of the City of Vancouver are
important criteria in reality but again are NOT the focus of the competition…”, to what extend
should we apply local bylaws into our design?
2. Should we display furniture layout in the floor plan? Do we need to specify furniture on the
submission list?
3. Do we need to specify upholstery furnishing and window treatment?
4. How much details are expected in the drawing?
5. Are interior design materials (such as toilet fixture, faucet, furniture, appliances) and plumbing
required to be made/ manufactured / recycled within 100 miles of the City of Vancouver?
6. Should fire safety system and sprinkler be included in the design?
7. How specific are the requirements for electrical and mechanical systems? Do we need to
specify wires, housing, face plate, etc.?

Please note that some of your questions have already been asked by other entrants, and are available for viewing at: http://100mh.architecturefoundationbc.ca/important-information/qa/

Further to that, the answers to your questions are as follows:

1) The site is hypothetical, simply a starting point, with the street at one end of the lot and a lane at the other. Adjacent lots would be the same. Dimensions are not important, but to fit in better with the context (i.e. the surrounding houses) you could set the front of the house back from the street, with at least 3′-0″ setbacks

from the sides. A typical Vancouver inner city neighbourhood (look at Google Earth at what is typical of Vancouver) has a service road at the rear of the site. Local bylaws are to apply in much the way good common sense would inform your design. Zero lot line designs will not be disqualified, but be mindful of context, as the jury most certainly will be.

2) A furniture plan is not necessary but could be helpful in allowing the jury to better visualize the space.

3) While fabrics used in window treatments and furniture upholstery fall between what is part of the house’s design and what constitutes the family’s belongings, it is your prerogative to include on your list of materials all items obtained locally while embracing the spirit of the competition, i.e. the 100 mile radius.

4) Details for waterproofing and fireproofing (as examples) are not required, but again use common sense to provide for a house which may be safely (and soundly) occupied.

5) ALL materials, including plumbing pipes and fixtures, are to be locally sourced where possible, and listed on the sheet of materials from outside the 100 mile radius if not.

6) See the response to question #3.

7) Electrical and mechanical equipment should be specified in much the same way as suggested in our response to question #5 – the more detailed your list of materials from both inside and outside the 100 mile radius, the more likely your scheme to be called out by the jury. You do not however have to provide detailed construction drawings of all the inner workings of the house. Perhaps emphasis on one or two could be more appropriate, at least as it informs the design of the house.

 

I have a question concerning the floor area after the high: does it includes spaces which are up to 150sm high? Are there any specific rules in Canada\'s building low about the minimum high of the living space?

The BC Building Code defines a habitable space as having a clear height of 2100mm or 6′-10 1/2″, which would exclude crawl spaces and the eaves of a roof from the floor area of the house.

 

Are kichen and bathroom appliances, such as washing machnes/cookers etc… & baths/sinks exempt from the 100 mile rule? Or should these also be sourced within the boundary?

In the spirit of the competition’s intent you should attempt to source as many of these materials (within reason) from inside the 100 mile radius. While some appliances may fall into the realm of the occupant’s personal belongings, you may wish to list these items on the list of materials from outside the 100 mile radius, however, your entry will not be disqualified if you fail to do so. Plumbing fixtures, electrical conduit, and HVAC materials also should be listed accordingly.


 

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